Sea Girl

sea girl 1Connections are a frequently used device within movies in order to tell a convincing story. If you can establish a link then you have the basis for a film that will both entertain and make your audience think. The short film Sea Girl does both.

A young girl is walking along the shore of Loch Lomond. She is deep in thought. As she walks her thoughts are conveyed via a voice over. She describes her love of the sea, how she feels connected to it and how being near to it changes who she is. The sea has a calming effect on her and allows her to clear her mind. She feels a strong connection tot he water and every time she is near the water it feels like coming home.

The film comes across like a visual poem. The images are there primarily to reinforce the narration. The voice over is measured and seductive with the sound of the waves lapping at the shore underpinning the sentiment of the words. The visuals sit very well with the commentary. It is shot (By Scott Watson) and edited in such a way as to allow the film to flow gently fitting well with the theme and tone.  The acting from the Writer / Director Natalie Smith is understated and is in line with the overall feel of the piece.

sea girl 2In its four and a half-minute run time it touches on some fairly weighty topics. The modern affliction of isolation within society is touched upon. In these days of ever expanding communication networks and the rise of the twenty-four hour society it is easy to feel as if you are lost and unable to get your bearings. Instead of succumbing to these feelings the narrator looks to the Sea as a way of coming to terms with the world. Another topic covered is a sense of belonging and finding that special place you can call home. For the girl, walking along the shore and sitting at the water’s edge brings on those feelings.

A special mention should go to the gentle yet haunting soundtrack that accompanies the film. It fits very nicely into the film and adds an element that can sometimes be lacking in short low budget films. Granted, the use of music is subject to licensing issues, but it is a nice touch when the film makers are able to go that bit further to provide a more complete cinematic experience.

Overall a subtle,visually engaging and thought provoking short film. Recommended.

John McArthur

Editor-in-Chief at Moviescramble. A Fan of all things cinematic with a love of Film Noir, Sci-Fi and Julia Roberts in Notting Hill. He hopes to grow up some day.

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